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How to avoid burnout in the helping professions

“People who work in helping professions [can be] prone to professional burnout,” says Katherine Martinez, a licensed marriage and family therapist and an instructor in the marriage, family and child therapy program at the University of Phoenix® Central Valley Campus in California.

How to become a mental health counselor

If you’re thinking about entering the mental health field, now’s a good time. The projected growth rate for mental health counselors and family therapists is 29 percent between 2012 and 2022 — much faster than average for all occupations, according to the U.S Bureau of Labor Statistics.

How nurses can advocate for their patients

“Advocating for patients is within [nursing’s] mission,” according to Susan Perkins, MSN, a nurse practice consultant who teaches in the nursing program at the University of Phoenix® Main Campus. She stresses that nurses should ask patients open questions to help determine their specific needs, and then go to bat for them when necessary....

How nurses can improve their safety on the job

Registered nurses have the fifth-highest rate of ergonomic injury in the nation, according to a report published in 2013 by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

These injuries, which can affect muscles, nerves, the spine and other parts ...

Why consider a career in a STEM field?

You may have heard the term “STEM” in the news and in conversations about job growth or new opportunities for employment. But what exactly does it mean?

The acronym stands for science, technology, engineering and math, explains ...

In-demand jobs for nurses outside the hospital

Many professionals who earn a nursing degree expect to work in a clinical setting, such as a hospital or doctor’s office. But there are lots of other places where nurses can apply their skills in nontraditional jobs, says Karen Jamison, PhD, an instructor in the nurse practitioner program at the University of Phoenix Main Campus....

Top traits of a nurse leader

Nurse leaders work both behind the scenes and in the public arena to improve their profession, as well as health care in their communities. And not all nurse leaders necessarily occupy top executive positions, either.

“All nurses have a leadership role to play,” says Angie Strawn, MS, ...

Why consider transitional care nursing?

An aging population and the Affordable Care Act have increased demand for transitional care, says Karen Jamison, PhD, a registered nurse who teaches in the nurse practitioner program at the University of Phoenix Main Campus.

“This area of nursing deals with transitioning high-risk patients from the ...

What is forensic nursing?

Picture the scene of a crime. That single setting is filled with hundreds of small clues that must be pieced together to solve the case. When detectives are stumped, they can turn to forensic nurses for help.

A combination of caregiver and crime solver, forensic nurses play a critical ...

How to make the most of a psychology degree

A bachelor’s degree in psychology “is enormously adaptable,” and a good jumping-off point for a variety of jobs, says Sandra Moody, MS, area chair of psychology programs for the College of Social Sciences at the University of Phoenix Bay Area Campus. “It provides an enormous number of skills that are useful in different areas.”...

What does a registered nurse do?

Registered nurses (RNs) are highly trained professionals with skills that set them apart from other members of the nursing staff.

“The designation ‘registered nurse’ is for nurses who have completed at least an associate degree in nursing or a Bachelor of Science degree in ...

Why get a Bachelor of Science in Nursing?

Many registered nurses (RNs) and licensed practical nurses (LPNs) don’t think they need a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degree. But while professional nursing regulations don’t usually require workers to have a BSN, the job market does, says Gemma O’Donnell, MS in nursing, who teaches in the LPN/LVN to BSN program at the University of Phoenix Main Campus....

4 reasons to become a nurse practitioner

Considering a career as a nurse practitioner (NP)? The future is bright in this field for advanced practice nurses who perform many of the tasks usually handled by physicians.

Here, two nurse practitioners describe why the vocation is rewarding and how ...

5 networking tips for health administrators

Heard the expression “It’s not what you know, but who you know”? While that might be true for some industries, in health administration, both aspects are equally important.

“What lands people jobs,” says Dean Athanassiades, MS, an online instructor ...

Why get a doctorate?

Think earning a doctorate means becoming a college professor? “This is a common myth,” says Ruby Rouse, PhD, a marketing consultant and an instructor in the University of Phoenix School of Advanced Studies (SAS).

“People think there is only one flavor of a doctorate — a PhD,” which trains ...

5 tips for new nurses

Not only did you diligently plow through all your required courses, but you also passed the licensing tests and landed your first nursing position.

Now comes the challenge of applying all your hard-earned skills to your new job....

How to nail an interview for a nursing job

We’ve all heard the same job interview questions: “What are your strengths? How about your weaknesses? Where do you see yourself in five years?” But if you’ve got your eye on a coveted nursing job, you’ll need to prepare for more specific questions to make the cut.

5 reasons now is a good time to become a nurse

Nursing is more prestigious than ever. Not only are nurses in demand, but they have more options of places to work and opportunities to learn new specialties.

“Gallup polls have called [nursing] the most trusted profession in America ...

5 ways the Affordable Care Act affects nursing

The federal Affordable Care Act (ACA) won’t take full effect until 2014, but it already is having a big impact on the health care system in general and on the nursing field in particular, says Pat Kiley, an advanced practice nurse who teaches health care ethics in the University of Phoenix nursing program.

Top career skills for health care administrators

Doctors and nurses may be the first people who come to mind when you think about the health care industry. But as aging baby boomers, returning veterans with long-term needs, and patients with chronic illnesses put increasing demands on the medical system, hospitals and health care services are hiring more administrators....

5 ways the nursing field is changing

Nurses a generation ago often had different goals than those in the profession today. “Back when I first started out in 1980, there were a lot of ‘refrigerator nurses,’ housewives who worked a few hours a week to pay for a fridge or new bathroom for the household,” explains Lesley Hunt, an instructor in the University of Phoenix nursing program....

Essential skills for a nursing career

Being a nurse these days isn’t just about taking temperatures and starting IVs. “When I first started my nursing career 30 years ago, the medical community scoffed at the idea of nurses being professionals with advanced skills,” notes Lesley Hunt, who teaches courses in the LPN/LVN to BSN program at the University of Phoenix Main Campus. “But now nurses are held to higher ...

5 emerging roles in nursing

As the U.S. health system evolves to meet the demands of aging baby boomers — as well as changes required by health care reform and new technologies — the roles of medical practitioners, especially nurses, are shifting, too.

According to Andrea Warwick, an instructor in the University of Phoenix ...

5 reasons to be a health care administrator

When you’re sick, doctors are your heroes. But they wouldn’t be able to do their jobs without the people who keep hospitals, clinics and private practices running smoothly: health care administrators.

These roles will be even more important in the remainder of this decade, ...

Rx for a nursing career in the future?
A four-year degree

You find them in coffee shops across the country — students in medical scrubs whose noses are buried in textbooks thicker than an engine block. They’re often nursing students preparing for the culmination of years of nursing classes: the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX®). Stricter industry requirements, however, could have nursing students studying ...