cmc220 | undergraduate

Information Products And Presentations

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News is presented differently for print, web, and broadcast delivery. This course covers the practical functions of reporting, writing, editing, and designing for each of these domains. It examines conventions within the culture of journalism and critiques various media from the viewpoint of both the producer and the consumer. Students continue to investigate the effect of news on individuals and society, and to explore opportunities in the communications field. This course requires a microphone and speakers or headphones for recording and listening to digital audio files. Students download software for recording audio files.

This undergraduate-level course is 9 weeks This course is available as part of a degree or certificate program. To enroll, speak with an Enrollment Representative.

Course details:

Credits: 3
Continuing education units: XX
Professional development units: XX
Duration: 9 weeks

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    Delivering the News

    • Explore the various technological influences on news content and delivery.
    • Describe interviewing as a method of news gathering.

    News Writing

    • Define major characteristics that differentiate between writing for print, broadcast, and the web.
    • Explain the importance of accuracy in the attribution of news sources.
    • Describe the differences between objective and interpretive news.

    What Editors Do

    • Describe how an editor’s work influences readers’ perceptions.
    • Describe the proper role of the AP Style Guide in performing editorial work.
    • Demonstrate ability to perform editorial duties for a print publication.

    News and Society

    • Identify the standards associated with responsible journalism.
    • Describe the value of news in society. 
    • Contrast the public’s right to new's information with the role of civic protection.

    Influence of the Web

    • Describe the influence of the web on journalism.
    • Compare the characteristics--such as writing techniques for the web--with other forms of data.

    The Look of Journalism

    • Apply components of backpack journalism and lateral reporting of web news.
    • Differentiate among typographically based graphics, chart-based graphics, and illustrations in conveying news information.
    • Explore the choices and challenges presented in web-based journalism.

    Broadcast News

    • Analyze the characteristics that make news narration effective.
    • Compare the differing structure of print news items with broadcast news items.
    • Demonstrate the factors for conducting news broadcasts that give them value.

    The Roots of Journalism

    • Compare the traditional role of the news media with modern forms.
    • Trace the technological causes of change in journalism from the 19th century to the present.
    • Define the foundations of media law.

    The Future of Journalism

    • Differentiate between objective news versus editorial opinion, particularly in light of increasing civic and public journalism.
    • Differentiate among objective news, public opinion information, and editorial opinions.
    Tuition for individual courses varies. For more information, please call or chat live with an Enrollment Representative.

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    Teacher Rate: For some courses, special tuition rates are available for current, certified P-12 teachers and administrators. Please speak with an Enrollment Representative today for more details.

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    The University of Phoenix reserves the right to modify courses.

    While widely available, not all programs are available in all locations or in both online and on-campus formats. Please check with a University Enrollment Representative.

    Transferability of credit is at the discretion of the receiving institution. It is the student’s responsibility to confirm whether or not credits earned at University of Phoenix will be accepted by another institution of the student’s choice.