edu539 | Graduate

K-12 Cybertraps: Strategies For Teaching Digital Citizenship

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In this course, participants gain an understanding of the ways in which students are using technology today and the legal and professional risks that can arise from such use. Participants develop instructional strategies, curricular materials, and projects to guide student learning on issues of online behavior and digital citizenship. The course emphasizes the interplay between law and technology, and underscores the potential for students to become unwitting perpetrators. Strategies for minimizing the risk of student misconduct and educating parents are also covered.

This graduate-level course is 6 weeks To enroll, speak with an Enrollment Representative.

Course details:

Credits: 3
Continuing education units: XX
Professional development units: XX
Duration: 6 weeks

topic title goes here

    Strategies and Solutions for Minimizing Misconduct

    • Develop techniques for incorporating digital citizenship concepts throughout contemporary curriculum.
    • Analyze existing laws, regulations, policies, and procedures aimed at preventing or punishing student digital misconduct.
    • Develop a plan for educating students, parents, and educators about the risks of digital misconduct.
    • List educational resources on developments in student use (and misuse) of technology.

    Review

    • All objectives apply.

    Students and Technology: An Overview

    • Identify types of hardware, software, websites, and apps most popular with students.
    • Discuss the role technology plays in student peer groups and social development.
    • Evaluate the guidance that students receive on safe and effective use of technology from peers, parents, and educators.

    Misconduct Towards the School

    • List various types of digital misconduct directed towards the school.
    • Evaluate the role of technology in facilitating digital misconduct towards the school.
    • Propose strategies for minimizing the risk of digital misconduct towards the school.

    Misconduct Towards Peers and Educators

    • List various types of digital misconduct directed towards peers and educators.
    • Evaluate the role of technology in facilitating digital misconduct towards peers and educators.
    • Propose strategies for minimizing the risk of digital misconduct towards peers and educators.

    Long-Term Impact of Digital Misconduct

    • Explain various costs and consequences of digital misconduct by students.
    • Evaluate the contributory role of technology in the types of damage caused by student digital misconduct.
    • Evaluate existing models for damage prevention and propose improvements.
    Tuition for individual courses varies. For more information, please call or chat live with an Enrollment Representative.

    Please ask about these special rates:

    Teacher Rate: For some courses, special tuition rates are available for current, certified P-12 teachers and administrators. Please speak with an Enrollment Representative today for more details.

    Military Rate: For some courses, special tuition rates are available for active duty military members and their spouses. Please speak with an Enrollment Representative today for more details.

    The University of Phoenix reserves the right to modify courses.

    While widely available, not all programs are available in all locations or in both online and on-campus formats. Please check with a University Enrollment Representative.

    Transferability of credit is at the discretion of the receiving institution. It is the student’s responsibility to confirm whether or not credits earned at University of Phoenix will be accepted by another institution of the student’s choice.