PHOENIX, Aug. 15, 2018 – As children across the U.S. head back to school, parents are preparing for changes in the family dynamic and planning ahead for school year expectations and their students’ success.

University of Phoenix® College of Education academic dean Dr. Pam Roggeman gives advice on how to best prepare for the new school year. “Supporting teachers as they learn how to best help your child succeed is the best gift you can give them,” said Dr. Roggeman.

According to a University of Phoenix survey of K–12 teachers*, many parents don’t get a passing grade when it comes to class participation. Nearly three-fourths of teachers say less than half of parents are involved in the classroom, and the majority of teachers (58 percent) say that less than a quarter of parents are involved.

Dr. Roggeman’s three tips for connecting with teachers:

  1. Teachers need working, positive relationships with their students’ parents. Education is a partnership. By establishing relationships, parents can learn more about what is happening in class, be of more help to their children because they keep current on classroom happenings and experiences, and help the child’s teacher to know the family and the child better.
  2. Teachers need students to self-advocate. This is a skill a parent can give to both their children and their teacher. This is also a life skill that will permeate all avenues of a child’s life. Regardless of the child’s age, each can benefit from learning age-appropriate ways to communicate their needs to their teachers, in the moment. School should be a setting where children learn how to, and practice, solving their own problems.
  3. Teachers need parents’ true support. Support ranges from responding when teachers put out a request for more classroom supply donations, helping students to stay current on long-term projects and even giving teachers the benefit of the doubt when they make academic decisions they think best benefit their students.

Parents connecting with their child’s teacher is an important step in supporting the child’s success. While collaborating with an educator may seem time consuming and overwhelming, following these tips can make it an easy, fruitful experience.

To learn more about programs offered through the College of Education, visit phoenix.edu/colleges_divisions/education.html.

* This survey was conducted online within the U.S. by Harris Poll on behalf of University of Phoenix between March 29 and April 3, 2017, among 1,001 U.S. adults aged 18 and older who are full-time employed as teachers in grades K-12 with at least an undergraduate degree.

About University of Phoenix® College of Education
University of Phoenix® College of Education has been educating teachers and school administrators for more than 30 years. The College of Education provides bachelor’s and master’s degree programs for individuals who want to become teachers or current educators and administrators seeking advanced degrees to strengthen their professional knowledge. With education programs available throughout most of the U.S., the College of Education has a distinct grasp of the national education picture and priorities for teacher preparation. Faculty members on average bring more than 17 years of professional experience to the classroom. For more information, visit phoenix.edu/education.

About University of Phoenix®
University of Phoenix is constantly innovating to help working adults move efficiently from education to careers in a rapidly changing world. Flexible schedules, relevant and engaging courses, and interactive learning can help students more effectively pursue career and personal aspirations while balancing their busy lives. As a subsidiary of Apollo Education Group, Inc., University of Phoenix serves a diverse student population, offering associate, bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degree programs from campuses and learning centers across the U.S. as well as online throughout the world. For more information, visit www.phoenix.edu.

 

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