Helping others rise

Together, we aim to lay the foundation for a lifelong commitment to service.

Communities strengthen

Volunteering is a vital part of our culture. Our students, staff and faculty have helped us establish a reputation as a service-minded university. Launched in 2007, the University of Phoenix Community Engagement Program aims to enhance the personal growth and development of our students, alumni, faculty and staff by providing meaningful community service opportunities.

Complement your classroom learning experience and cultivate relationships within your community to last a lifetime—get involved.

All hands on deck

Our employees are encouraged to spend two paid days off each year volunteering for a cause of their choice. We value integrity, social responsibility and we hope to all play a major role in improving the communities in which we live.

By getting involved in their local communities, our University family members get a sense of fulfillment and remain engaged.


“Volunteerism encourages teamwork and promotes leadership and skill building that enhances career, education and life development.”


Our company-wide efforts focus on our core values: sustainability, education-related philanthropy and volunteering.


“Volunteerism provides skilled and talented volunteers that offer direct cost savings to nonprofit organizations and help bring community needs into focus.”


For questions about University of Phoenix volunteer opportunities, please email

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Success stories

We believe that the efforts we make in our local communities today will foster success stories long into the future. These success stories are the real reward for us at University of Phoenix.

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0:00 assuming I'm 17 years all night to complete his Christian labor attend come
0:09 under high school year seventeen I go to compulsory
0:15 it's kind of a different kind of school on people look at it at continuation
0:19 alternative and it has a reputation because a lot of kids that failed
0:24 classes or have been in trouble they get sent there I was a troublesome case
0:30 November my sophomore year and that's when they told me I looked around and I
0:36 was like I want to change I want to change who I am i dont wanna be no one I
0:44 want to do something like so it was software when I got pregnant and there's
0:50 a lot of stuff that's happened for all four years of high school I have an
0:53 experience as much as I'd like to the beginning we thought we so I didn't have
1:00 a high school life I had to like grow up so fast when they found out a lot of
1:05 people don't like me a lot of people just talked about me when people would
1:09 say stop when you go out in public
1:10 my family didn't really want to be around me when I was pregnant I guess
1:15 they were like machine those 15 it's definitely hard the hardest thing I
1:20 think I've had ever experienced and ever since then I've been struggling in
1:24 school sometimes I do wanna give up
1:30 we're about to go to university of Phoenix to interview people that have
1:35 been highly successful in their life I just cannot talk to them how they got
1:40 here today where were you when you were our age did you have any matters in life
1:47 growing up when I was your age I really didn't know what I wanted to do
1:53 throughout my life I wanted to be different things what you want now is
2:00 like 17 18 year olds might change down the line
2:03 my career path I'm really happy with where I am do I need to be a VP do I
2:09 need to be a CEO yeah this is where I am and I'm gonna try in life you have to
2:15 find what you love and hopefully get paid for which I am very lucky to be
2:20 able to do I think talking about it like helped a lot and it's fun to just be
2:25 able to interact with a slight cough the story and the story line during our age
2:34 could you have ever seen yourself being president and CEO
2:38 never in a million years not unlike the two of you I was a teenage mother I
2:44 ended up getting pregnant in my senior year of high school and had to finish
2:49 high school at an alternative school which was for me a huge embarrassment
2:56 and emotionally and mentally started to really do great and I didn't have goals
3:01 or a vision for the future and idea it was like that was you know going to be
3:06 my life which I find kind of phenomenal now that I look back at Susan then like
3:12 why didn't why didn't you have a vision or see that there was potential for you
3:19 what I didn't know was what my education would do for me and where it would take
3:24 me an above and beyond just the knowledge that you get is the ability to
3:28 see something through and the ability to move forward in life it was really
3:32 shocking to hear that she was a teen mom like she really just touched me my life
3:37 make me wanna cry or just really does want is a hugger some people they can
3:41 tell you that they know it's hard but they really don't like they don't
3:46 understand I've never met somebody personally that actually been through
3:51 what we have I just like the fact that she says he will be four to just go for
3:55 whatever you really desire to do you guys have all the potential world you
4:00 just have to want it and go for it we live in such a pool time that you guys
4:03 can do and become whatever you want as long as you were talking is people
4:09 definitely made me realize I can do whatever I want if I work hard I have to
4:15 fight for the things I want
4:18 gonna be a challenge for me but it's a matter of myself most of them all out a
4:23 little bit of struggles to get to where they are today and they all have really
4:26 good careers now and nothing just gonna go perfect with in the end it will be
4:30 worth it
4:31 this was a really awesome experience

University of Phoenix alumni share their road with at-risk teens

As part of our “Share Your Road” program, University of Phoenix partnered with Road Trip Nation to connect high-school students with alumni mentors. Sit in as three at-risk teens find encouragement from our alumni’s stories.

Contact us: