University of Phoenix’s Response to COVID-19

To Our Community of Students, Alumni, Employees and Partners

The COVID-19 pandemic is impacting our country, and the world, in unprecedented ways. It is an evolving crisis that we are monitoring closely. We created this microsite so our students and stakeholders have a resource to access for up-to-date information regarding our actions related to the pandemic. Here are some of the ways University of Phoenix is addressing the COVID-19 pandemic. Please check back frequently for updates.

Here are some of the ways University of Phoenix is currently addressing the COVID-19 pandemic:

  • Members of the University’s Security Operations Team are participating in local, state and national briefings with public health professionals, who are receiving updates directly from the CDC. These meetings ensure that we are getting regular, critical updates from government officials on the front line of this pandemic.
  • We have created this microsite, as well as posted informational flyers from the CDC at all of our locations around the US. This microsite and the flyers provide tips and links to resources about the Coronavirus.
  • At all of our locations, we have increased the already thorough cleaning and disinfecting we do on a daily basis to keep germs at bay. And, we’ve added additional hand-sanitizing units in all public places. All visitors and employees have access to sinks with soap and water.

According to health experts, the best way to protect yourself is to proactively practice good hygiene behaviors that help to prevent the spread of illnesses. The CDC offers the following tips:

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick;
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth;
  • Stay home when you are sick;
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash;
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using regular household cleaning spray or wipes;
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after going to the bathroom; before eating; and after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.
  • Choose to elbow-bump rather than shake hands.

Please continue to monitor this microsite for updates. Any changes to our operations will be conveyed to our students and stakeholders through multiple communication pathways, including email, e-Campus, text, Facebook groups and this microsite. Students can also call their Academic Counselors for information or with questions. Thank you.

See All Coronavirus-related Updates from UOPX

UOPX In the News Regarding COVID-19

FAQs About Coronavirus

Per the CDC, the following symptoms may develop in the 14 days after exposure to someone who has COVID-19 infection:

  • Cough
  • Difficulty breathing
  • High Fever

Read about COVID-19 symptoms.

The virus is thought to spread mainly from person-to-person.

  • Between people who are in close contact with one another (within about six feet). It’s thought to transmit through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes. These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs.
  • It is also spread from contact with infected surfaces or objects It may be possible that a person can get COVID-19 by touching a surface or object that has the virus on it and then touching their own mouth, nose, or possibly their eyes, but this is not thought to be the main way the virus spreads.

Read more about how COVID-19 spreads.

Take simple precautions to reduce your risk of illness: 

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.
  • Stay home when you are sick.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipe.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after going to the bathroom; before eating; and after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.

Read about COVID-19 prevention.

Those who have symptoms of acute respiratory illness are recommended to stay home and not come to work or school until they are free of fever (100.4° F [37.8° C] or greater using an oral thermometer), signs of a fever, and any other symptoms for at least 24 hours, without the use of fever-reducing or other symptom-altering medicines (e.g. cough suppressants). 

Per the CDC, if you develop a fever and symptoms of respiratory illness, such as cough or shortness of breath, within 14 days after travel from an area impacted by COVID-19, you should call ahead to a healthcare professional and mention your recent travel or close contact. If you have had close contact with someone showing these symptoms who has recently traveled from an area affected by COVID-19, you should call ahead to a healthcare professional and mention your close contact and their recent travel. Your healthcare professional will work with your state’s public health department and CDC to determine if you need to be tested for COVID-19.

State Health Department's list

Yes. The CDC say you should cover your mouth and nose with a cloth face cover when around others. You could spread COVID-19 to others, even if you do not feel sick.

  • Everyone should wear a cloth face cover when they have to go out in public, for example to the grocery store or to pick up other necessities.
  • Cloth face coverings should not be placed on young children under age 2, anyone who has trouble breathing, or is unconscious, incapacitated or otherwise unable to remove the mask without assistance.
  • The cloth face cover is meant to protect other people in case you are infected.
  • Do NOT use a facemask meant for a healthcare worker.
  • Continue to keep about 6 feet between yourself and others. The cloth face cover is not a substitute for social distancing.

We have a cross-functional team that meets daily to monitor the rapidly evolving situation with a focus on preparing for a wide range of issues including health and safety, campus closures, event cancellations and travel. We will follow advice and directives from the CDC and the World Health Organization (WHO) and take the necessary precautions to protect our employee’s health.

We are postponing several of our larger in-person events and are making meetings virtual as often as possible. We encourage you to adopt virtual meetings for in-person gatherings to lessen the risk of illness. Look in the Updates section of this microsite for details (make this link back to the section)

Thus far, we have cancelled:

  • April Commencement in Charlotte
  • April Residency for College of Doctoral Studies students
  • May Commencement in Phoenix

The CDC recommends that travelers avoid all nonessential travel to certain destinations.

Read about CDC travel recommendations.

We recommend that you visit the Center for Disease Control (CDC) and World Health Organization (WHO) websites for the most accurate information and updates on the coronavirus. Links to their websites can be found below.

If you need help managing the stress resulting from Covid-19, please visit one of the following resources:

Disclaimer: In any case where your stress or anxiety level is severe or is impairing your day-to-day functioning in any way, please seek professional help. If you feel depressed or suicidal, contact the Suicide Prevention Lifeline (1-800-273-8255) immediately.